Economics (ECON)

ECON 1001. Ecomics at Work. 1 Credit Hour.

Students are introduced to career opportunities in ecnomics and explore/identify how economics is used in different employment contexts.

ECON 1XXX. Economics Elective. 1-21 Credit Hours.

ECON 2100. Economic Analysis and Policy Problems. 3 Credit Hours.

Practice in analysis of decision problems of relevance to students in public policy and personal decision areas. Issues relating to individual decisions to produce, consume, invest, and trade will be explored. Analytical approaches will enable students to use and incorporate basic elements of micro- and macro-economic analysis and to appreciate issues regarding testing and measurements.Students can receive credit for either ECON 2100 or ECON 2101, or for ECON 2105/2106.Students cannot receive credit for ECON 2100 and ECON 2101 or for ECON 2100 and ECON 2105/2106 or for ECON 2101 and ECON 2105/2106.

ECON 2101. The Global Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

Historical and theoretical understanding of global economy, including international trade, finance, investment production; regional economic integration; economic development; environment, using micro and macro economic principles.Students can receive credit for either ECON 2100 or ECON 2101,or for ECON 2105/2106. Students cannot receivecredit for ECON 2100 and ECON 2101 or for ECON 2100 and ECON 2105/2106 or for ECON 2101 and ECON 2105/2106.

ECON 2105. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Credit Hours.

This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies.Students can receive credit for either ECON 2100 or ECON 2101,or for ECON 2105/2106. Students cannot receive credit for ECON 2100 and ECON 2101 or for ECON 2100 and ECON 2105/2106 or for ECON 2101 and ECON 2105/2106.

ECON 2106. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Credit Hours.

This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze structure and performance of the market economy. Students can receive credit for either ECON 2100 or ECON 2101,or for ECON 2105/2106. Students cannot receive credit for ECON 2100 and ECON 2101 or for ECON 2100 and ECON 2105/2106 or for ECON 2101 and ECON 2105/2106.

ECON 2250. Statistics for Economists. 3 Credit Hours.

This course provides an introduction to probability theory and statistical inference. Students will explore tools and concepts relevant to the study of economics and gain a familiarity with statistical software widely used by economists.

ECON 2698. Undergraduate Research Assistantship. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Independent research conducted under the guidance of a faculty member.

ECON 2699. Undergraduate Research. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Independent research conducted under the guidance of a faculty member.

ECON 2803. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Special topic offerings of current interest not included in permanent courses.

ECON 2XXX. Economics Elective. 1-21 Credit Hours.

ECON 3110. Advanced Microeconomic Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Review of important mathematical tools and techniques used in advanced microeconomics. Advanced topics include the estimation of demand and cost functions; the role of government in the economy (externalities, property rights, and public goods); public choice theory; factor markets (especially labor and capital markets); models of monopoly; pricing techniques used by firms with market power (monopolies and oligopolies); and game theory.

ECON 3120. Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Integrates issues arising from international economic relationships with the macroeconomic dynamics of domestic economies. Income determination in the open economy and the effect of stabilization policies on the international monetary system.

ECON 3150. Economic and Financial Modeling. 3 Credit Hours.

The course develops student ability to model the essential elements of the investment decision through use of a valuation model and spreadsheet analysis. Expands upon basic knowledge of present value analysis to recognize risk, growth, capital markets, and market valuation of ongoing operations.

ECON 3160. Introduction to Empirical Economics: Data Visualization, Analysis, and Presentation. 3 Credit Hours.

Develops student abilities to logically formulate economic issues; identify and collect data from traditional and Internet sources; analyze data using spreadsheet and presentation software; generate sound and defensible conclusions and recommendations; and make effective presentations of analysis and conclusions.

ECON 3161. Econometric Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Econometric techniques and applications in economic and business analysis. Practical issues involving modeling, estimation, hypothesis testing, and emphasizing computer implementation through econometric software.

ECON 3300. Economics of International Energy Markets. 3 Credit Hours.

Economics of international energy markets and how business and government policy decisions are made. Economic models, and financial, institutional and regulatory aspects of energy markets.

ECON 3XXX. Economics Elective. 1-21 Credit Hours.

ECON 4060. Money and Capital Markets. 3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the role of money in the exchange process, the Federal Reserve's monetary policy strategy, and the impact of monetary policy on financial markets and aggregate economic activity.

ECON 4160. Economic Forecasting. 3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to widely used economic and business forecasting methods, emphasizing quantitative approaches and computer implementation through time-series econometric software.

ECON 4170. Mathematics for Economic Modeling. 3 Credit Hours.

The application of mathematical tools to economic analysis. Topics include static analysis, comparative-static analysis, optimization, and dynamic analysis.

ECON 4180. Game Theory for Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Course covers static games of complete information, dynamic games of complete information, static games of incomplete information and dynamic games of incomplete information.

ECON 4232. Labor Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Provides an introduction to the theory and practice of contemporary labor economics. The aim is to understand the forces that influence behavior in the labor market.

ECON 4301. Economics of Information, Transactions Costs, and Contracts. 3 Credit Hours.

Builds from analysis of the individual in a trading or transaction situation to study organizations as groups of affiliated individuals. Assesses the situations when organizations are preferable to markets as forms of organizing economic and social activity. Institutional economics and transaction cost economics are studied. Analysis of corporate restructuring and privatization.

ECON 4311. Strategic Economics for Global Enterprise. 3 Credit Hours.

This introductory course on the multinational enterprise (MNE) will examine from an economic and interdisciplinary perspective the challenges facing MNE's in a fast-changing international business environment. The emphasis will be on the use of economic tools to analyze these issues and understand their managerial implications.

ECON 4321. Economics of Technology, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of level and type of entrepreneurial activity. Study of business and economic history, legal, and institutional arrangements.

ECON 4340. Economics of Industrial Competition. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the theory of the firm, the relationship between market structure, practices, and performance, and the determinants of technological change. The role (and ability) of government policy to solve various market failures, via antitrust enforcement, regulation, etc., is also discussed.

ECON 4345. Economic Regulation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines how government economically regulates private industry, how it might regulate more efficiently, and when it should not regulate at all. General theories of antitrust enforcement and economic regulation are developed and applied to a variety of industry cases.

ECON 4350. International Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This is an introductory course in international economics and will cover important topics in trade theory, trade policy, and international finance. The emphasis will be on using economic tools to analyze a variety of current events in the world economy.

ECON 4351. International Financial Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course familiarizes students with concepts, models, theories and applications in international markets.

ECON 4355. Global Financial Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Examines the system of markets and institutions for exchange of capital, money, and goods, in the global marketplace; impact on national economics and fundamental economic global relationships.

ECON 4357. Law and Economics of the Global Trading System. 3 Credit Hours.

ECON 4360. Network Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine alternative network architectures (e.g. simple ring networks, two star networks connected by a trunk line), explore how differences in a network's economic characteristics have different market structure implications and accordingly, lead to alternative public policy stances.

ECON 4370. Law and Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

To introduce students to economic aspects of legal decision-making and to develop students' ability to critically analyze the purposes and efficiency of legal decision-making from an economic perspective.

ECON 4411. Economic Development. 3 Credit Hours.

Concepts and studies of developing economies. Selected topics include development experience and theories, growth, agriculture, urbanization, industrialization, and links between trade policy and development.

ECON 4412. Cost-Benefit Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will acquaint the student with the principles, tools, issues, strengths, and limitations of cost-benefit analysis (CBA); to prepare the student to competently review, criticize, and use CBA studies; and to enable the student to carry out limited CBA studies.

ECON 4415. Conflict and Security in Developing Countries. 3 Credit Hours.

This course engages undergraduate students in the analysis of multiple dimensions of contemporary civil conflict and serves as an introduction to economic studies of terrorism.

ECON 4421. Urban and Regional Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Economics of regions, cities, and space. Theories of growth and location, effects of urbanization, agglomeration, and congestion. Public policy relating to urban and regional problems.

ECON 4430. Economics of Transportation and Communication Systems. 3 Credit Hours.

Economic analysis for the design, operation, and management of transportation and communication systems. Study of systems analysis and modeling. Application to industry and study of industrial change and dynamics. Special attention to corporate restructuring and industrial consolidation and merger.

ECON 4440. Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment. 3 Credit Hours.

This course covers three aspects of environmental economics. First, it considers policy interventions appropriate to problems involving environmental externalities. Second, it explains methods used to estimate economic values for environmental goods. Finally, it explains the economics of depletable and renewable resources.

ECON 4450. Topics in African American Entrepreneurship. 3 Credit Hours.

History and dynamics of African-American business. Impact of racial segregation on business formation. Case studies and empirical exercises.

ECON 4460. Public Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course focuses on public goods, how public decisions regarding public goods are made, the "free-rider" problem, voting and taxation principles, welfare, the Tiebout Hypothesis, budgeting, and fiscal policies.

ECON 4510. Economics of Health and Health Care. 3 Credit Hours.

This course surveys the theoretical and empirical evidence regarding current issues in health and health care. Individual-level models of health behaviors and the demand for health and medical insurance are presented. The economic behaviors of physicians, hospitals, and insurance companies are also characterized. The possible role of government in encouraging the equitable and efficient performance of health markets is discussed with a particular emphasis on current debates involving individual health decisions, health care reform, and the diffusion of new medical technologies.

ECON 4520. Economics of Sports. 3 Credit Hours.

Economic tools will be used to assess the role sports plays in our society.

ECON 4610. Seminar in Economic Policy. 3 Credit Hours.

The objective of the course is to enable students to interpret current economic problems and policies using the economic models learned in their theory courses. Students study the current "Economic Report of the President" and apply analytical tools to the data included in the text. Each student selects a current issue for detailed examination and report.

ECON 4620. History of Economic Thought. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is concerned with the economists who interpreted and influenced the development of capitalism and socialism over the last two centuries.

ECON 4698. Undergraduate Research Assistantship. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Independent research conducted under the guidance of a faculty member,

ECON 4699. Undergraduate Research. 1-12 Credit Hours.

Independent research conducted under the guidance of a faculty member.

ECON 4740. Seminar in Political Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

Capstone experience in which students apply the tools of politicall economy to international issues. Crosslisted with INTA 4740.

ECON 4741. Thesis in Political Economy. 3 Credit Hours.

Individual project applying the tools of political economy to international issues. Crosslisted with INTA 4741.

ECON 4803. Special Topics in Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses designed to permit students and a professor to pursue a specialized interest in an area of economics not extensively treated in the offerings of the School.

ECON 4811. Special Topics in Economics. 1 Credit Hour.

Courses designed to permit students and a professor to pursue a specialized interest in an area of economics not extensively treated in the offerings of the School.

ECON 4812. Special Topics in Economics. 2 Credit Hours.

Courses designed to permit students and a professor to pursue a specialized interest in an area of economics not extensively treated in the offerings of the School.

ECON 4813. Special Topics in Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Courses designed to permit students and a professor to pursue a specialized interest in an area of economics not extensively treated in the offerings of the School.

ECON 4814. Special Topics in Economics. 4 Credit Hours.

Courses designed to permit students and a professor to pursue a specialized interest in an area of economics not extensively treated in the offerings of the School.

ECON 4815. Special Topics in Economics. 5 Credit Hours.

Courses designed to permit students and a professor to pursue a specialized interest in an area of economics not extensively treated in the offerings of the School.

ECON 4901. Individual Research in Economics. 1-21 Credit Hours.

Designed to permit independent study with a faculty member.

ECON 4910. Individual Research in Economics. 3 Credit Hours.

Course related to independent student research. Topics determined by instructor and student.

ECON 4990. Georgia Internship Program. 1-21 Credit Hours.

Course projects related to professional internships. Topics and requirements to be arranged by student, instructor, and sponsor.

ECON 4XXX. Economics Elective. 1-21 Credit Hours.